v9.5.0.32 Micro Update: HTTP Connection Left in Invalid State after Event Callback Aborts Operation

For HTTP requests that have KeepAlive indicated in the response header, the internal connection is not closed so that a subsequent request may continue using the existing connection. However, when the client application aborts in the middle of receiving the response, the connection must be closed to avoid being left in an invalid state (where the some of the remainder of the aborted request may have already been received and would incorrectly be read as the first bytes of the nexxt response). The internal fix was to always close the connection after an abort so that the next HTTP operation starts afresh on a new connection.

Aborting in C++

The technique for aborting any time-consuming Chilkat C++ method call follows this recipe:

  1. Declare your own class that derives from the appropriate Chilkat progress monitoring class.  For CkMailMan it is CkMailManProgress (as shown below).  For other Chilkat classes it is CkHttpProgress, CkFtpProgress, CkImapProgress, CkZipProgress, etc.
  2. Create an implementation for the AbortCheck method.  This will override the default implementation from the base class.  (The default implementation simply does nothing.)
  3. The AbortCheck method is called periodically according to the value of the HeartbeatMs property.  The default value of HeartbeatMs is 0, which indicate that no AbortCheck events should be called.  Set HeartbeatMs to a non-zero value (in milliseconds) to enable the AbortCheck callbacks.  Do this by calling put_HeartbeatMs(someValue)  as shown below.
  4. Whenever your application wishes to abort an operation in progress (SMTP, POP3, IMAP, Zip, FTP, etc.), set the abort boolean argument of AbortCheck to true.
  5. Don’t forget to hookup your event monitoring class by calling the SetProgressCallback method.  (See the code example below.)  In some classes, such as for CkImap, the way to hookup the event class is via the put_EventCallbackObject function.  Please review the .h file for details.
#include <CkMailManProgress.h>

class MyMailProgress : public CkMailManProgress
    {
    public:
	MyMailProgress(void) { }
	virtual ~MyMailProgress(void) { }

	// Override the AbortCheck method (which is a virtual method in CkMailProgress)
	// Called periodically according to the value of the HeartbeatMs property.
	void AbortCheck(bool *abort)
	    {
	    printf("AbortCheck!\n");

	    // If your application wishes to abort the email sending/receiving operation,
	    // set the abort boolean like this:
	    *abort = true;
	    }

        // Percentage completion events may also be overridden to abort time-consuming operations.
	void SendPercentDone(long pctDone, bool *abort) 
	    { 
	    printf("SendPercentDone: %d percent\n",pctDone);
	    }
	void ReadPercentDone(long pctDone, bool *abort) 
	    { 
	    printf("ReadPercentDone: %d percent\n",pctDone);
	    }

    };

void AbortCheckDemo(void)
    {
    CkMailMan mailman;
    bool success;
    success = mailman.UnlockComponent("30-day trial");
    if (success != true)
	{
        printf("%s\n",mailman.lastErrorText());
        return;
	}

    // Set the HeartbeatMs property so that AbortCheck is called once every 80 milliseconds.
    mailman.put_HeartbeatMs(80);

    MyMailProgress myProgress;
    mailman.SetProgressCallback(&myProgress);

    CkEmail email;
    // ...
    // ...

    // The AbortCheck event is called periodically while SendEmail is in progress..
    // (Note: In some cases, including here, a percent-done event is also called, and it will have an "abort"
    // boolean argument that may be set to "true" to force an abort.
    // If the percent-done callbacks happen more frequently than the HeartbeatMs setting, then 
    // the AbortCheck events may not be fired at all.)
    success = mailman.SendEmail(email);
    if (success != true)
	{
        printf("%s\n",mailman.lastErrorText());
        return;
	}

    }